Comedy Central Cuts Coulter’s Conscience

You could say Ann Coulter was the butt of all their jokes, if she had one. (Groan.)

comedy-central-cuts-coulters-conscience

The Let’s Roast Ann Coulter Instead of Rob Lowe Roast was truly eye-opening, revealing the heart of Hollywood and of Ann Coulter.

Neglected are crucial portions of the taped program cut from the broadcast version.

Coulter contends that Comedy Central edited the final version to make her look bad. (Here is an annotated transcript of her set as broadcast.) Comedy Central also appears to have edited out at least one portion which shows Coulter’s humanity, her conscience.

Steve Bramucci reported his eyewitness account of the taping, observing:

“There was one final moment of unexpected Coulter pathos, though. When she was supposed to insult Jewel – something about the singer’s teeth – she broke into her own joke to apologize, saying, ‘they’re making me say this.’”

This is remarkable for three reasons. First, no one ever makes Coulter say or do anything. Everything she does is what she wants to do. Therefore, she is responsible for every single word she says and action she takes.

Second, Coulter never apologizes!

Even more remarkable, Ann felt a twinge of guilt – even having just been savaged by hostile peers. At that very moment, her conscience was pricked.

Why?

Did Coulter, perhaps for the first time in a very long time, personally feel what it’s like to receive the kind of vitriol her victims regularly feel? Did she finally grasp that the reason she is so hated is because she is so hateful?

About that God moment, Bramucci remarked, “It was also the most humanity I can remember her showing in a public setting.”

Humanity – a thing of beauty.

He continued: “The moment was so jarring that the guy working the teleprompter must’ve fallen out of his chair, because the scroll stopped halfway through Coulter’s set and she had to literally beg for it to go back on.”

Perhaps the most important thing we’ve learned about Coulter is that she is a human being, too. (I can envision a roaster saying, “Even monsters have feelings.”)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s